70sscifiart:

"Saturn 3," 1980

70sscifiart:

"Saturn 3," 1980

seanhowe:

"Drew Friedman’s Heroes of the Comics aren’t muscly miracle men but rather the guys who created them—stooped over drawing boards, filling out their cardigans, and reflecting on the march of decades. Friedman curates and humanizes, and he laughs and almost cries. Let him show you around.”Download a free 21-page sample of Drew Friedman’s Heroes of the Comics here.

seanhowe:

"Drew Friedman’s Heroes of the Comics aren’t muscly miracle men but rather the guys who created them—stooped over drawing boards, filling out their cardigans, and reflecting on the march of decades. Friedman curates and humanizes, and he laughs and almost cries. Let him show you around.”

Download a free 21-page sample of Drew Friedman’s Heroes of the Comics here.

Whether

There’s thunder in the distance, and rain just outside the window.  The side of the house next door looks like a distorted leering cartoon animal of some kind and I’m craving whiskey.  

Which means I’m about to have some whiskey.  

I have nothing in particular to write about, it just seems like a prime moment to do some writing.  Why squander it?  As I type out that very question the thunder cracks out much closer by.  I realize that that’s not actually an answer, but damned if it doesn’t put me in the zone.  

Read More

mattfractionblog:

ralfmaximus:

kenyatta:

New app will keep you away from ‘sketchy’ areas

SketchFactor, the brainchild of co-founders Allison McGuire and Daniel Herrington, is a Manhattan-based navigation app that crowdsources user experiences along with publicly available data to rate the relative “sketchiness” of certain areas in major cities. The app will launch on iTunes on Friday, capping off a big week for the startup, which was named as a finalist in NYC BigApps, a city-sponsored competition.
According to Ms. McGuire, a Los Angeles native who lives in the West Village, the impetus behind SketchFactor was her experience as a young woman navigating the streets of Washington, D.C., where she worked at a nonprofit.
"How can we take large amounts of data and crowdsource opinions on certain areas?" she wondered to herself. "I brought that idea to a Lean Startup event in D.C., it got a huge reception and suddenly I was on my way."
The founders are also bracing for potential complications from an app that asks anonymous users to judge a neighborhood’s sketchiness. After all, fear can be subjective. And the site could be vulnerable to criticisms regarding the degree to which race is used to profile a neighborhood.
"We understand that people will see this issue," Ms. McGuire said. "And even though Dan and I are admittedly both young, white people, the app is not built for us as young, white people. As far as we’re concerned, racial profiling is ‘sketchy’ and we are trying to empower users to report incidents of racism against them and define their own experience of the streets."

Doublespeak of the day.

Help me kickstarter my new DogWhistle app that lets me say racist things about neighborhoods while sounding hip & trendy.

"Not Wanting To Sound Like A Racist"? There’s an app for that.

Dude’s name is Herrington and he looks like a Matt Berry character, how is this even real life? 

mattfractionblog:

ralfmaximus:

kenyatta:

New app will keep you away from ‘sketchy’ areas

SketchFactor, the brainchild of co-founders Allison McGuire and Daniel Herrington, is a Manhattan-based navigation app that crowdsources user experiences along with publicly available data to rate the relative “sketchiness” of certain areas in major cities. The app will launch on iTunes on Friday, capping off a big week for the startup, which was named as a finalist in NYC BigApps, a city-sponsored competition.

According to Ms. McGuire, a Los Angeles native who lives in the West Village, the impetus behind SketchFactor was her experience as a young woman navigating the streets of Washington, D.C., where she worked at a nonprofit.

"How can we take large amounts of data and crowdsource opinions on certain areas?" she wondered to herself. "I brought that idea to a Lean Startup event in D.C., it got a huge reception and suddenly I was on my way."

The founders are also bracing for potential complications from an app that asks anonymous users to judge a neighborhood’s sketchiness. After all, fear can be subjective. And the site could be vulnerable to criticisms regarding the degree to which race is used to profile a neighborhood.

"We understand that people will see this issue," Ms. McGuire said. "And even though Dan and I are admittedly both young, white people, the app is not built for us as young, white people. As far as we’re concerned, racial profiling is ‘sketchy’ and we are trying to empower users to report incidents of racism against them and define their own experience of the streets."

Doublespeak of the day.

Help me kickstarter my new DogWhistle app that lets me say racist things about neighborhoods while sounding hip & trendy.

"Not Wanting To Sound Like A Racist"? There’s an app for that.

Dude’s name is Herrington and he looks like a Matt Berry character, how is this even real life? 

How come no one ever does these things for me?

How come no one ever does these things for me?

(Source: katumus, via falsecreekchange)

thecomicsvault:

COMIC BOOK CLOSE UP
B A T G I R LDetective Comics #487 (Dec. 1980)Jose Delbo (pencils), Joe Giella (inks) & Gene D’Angelo (colors)

thecomicsvault:

COMIC BOOK CLOSE UP

B A T G I R L
Detective Comics #487 (Dec. 1980)
Jose Delbo (pencils), Joe Giella (inks) & Gene D’Angelo (colors)

(via falsecreekchange)

Most writers were the kids who easily, almost automatically, got A’s in English class. (There are exceptions, but they often also seem to be exceptions to the general writerly habit of putting off writing as long as possible.) At an early age, when grammar school teachers were struggling to inculcate the lesson that effort was the main key to success in school, these future scribblers gave the obvious lie to this assertion. Where others read haltingly, they were plowing two grades ahead in the reading workbooks. These are the kids who turned in a completed YA novel for their fifth-grade project. It isn’t that they never failed, but at a very early age, they didn’t have to fail much; their natural talents kept them at the head of the class.

This teaches a very bad, very false lesson: that success in work mostly depends on natural talent. Unfortunately, when you are a professional writer, you are competing with all the other kids who were at the top of their English classes. Your stuff may not—indeed, probably won’t—be the best anymore.

If you’ve spent most of your life cruising ahead on natural ability, doing what came easily and quickly, every word you write becomes a test of just how much ability you have, every article a referendum on how good a writer you are. As long as you have not written that article, that speech, that novel, it could still be good. Before you take to the keys, you are Proust and Oscar Wilde and George Orwell all rolled up into one delicious package. By the time you’re finished, you’re more like one of those 1940’s pulp hacks who strung hundred-page paragraphs together with semicolons because it was too much effort to figure out where the sentence should end.

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinators - Megan McArdle - The Atlantic

The Why Writing Is So Hard field of psychology is very interesting to me.

(via amyelizabeth)

Hooooly shit

(via ellemacattack)

Ditto on that “Hooooly shit” part

(via ellemacattack)

spaceexp:

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured Saturn’s rings and planet Earth and its moon. This is only the third time that Earth has been capture from the outer solar system.

spaceexp:

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft captured Saturn’s rings and planet Earth and its moon. This is only the third time that Earth has been capture from the outer solar system.

(via arcaneimages)

(Source: modrules, via anniewu)

Let a black person have…

African American Proverb—usually said after a white person commits a ridiculously illegal or immoral act and remains in possession of his life, fortune, and/or freedom. Ex: “Let a black person have run up on some cops like 'I'm on 'shrooms!' Dead in two seconds. Two. Tasers? Chile, please.”

For maximum effect one must lean forward and point vigorously during the words let, black, and person.

Alternate versions:

  • "But let my black ass have…"
  • "Now you know damn well if one of us had…"

(Reblogging ‘cause I wrote it and it’s still true!)

(Source: blackproverbs, via iamdavidbrothers)